Surface ice at Moon’s poles

Water is the preliminary and fundamental requirement needed for everyday life. It is very unique molecule due to some important chemical properties, it has high surface tension and high value of specific heat capacity and more importantly, it is the only substance found on earth in its all three states, gas, liquid and solid.  Our planet Earth is blue planet and hence its greenery only because of presence of water in it. Earth is estimated to have approximately 1.4 x kg water in the oceans.  It is supposed that water is present over the entire universe since study reveals its presence in the interstellar medium (ISM) as well as in the spectra of stars.

 

Achieving the milestone of one of the great mission, a team of space scientists, led by Shuai Li of the University of Hawaii and Brown University & Richard Elphic from NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Vally, directly observed evidence of water in the form of ice on the moon’s surface which was found in the darkest and coldest parts of its polar regions. This is the very first evidence directly observed by the scientist supporting water on moon’s surface.

Image above clearly indicates the distribution of ice (blue colored locations) at the surface of moon, South Pole (left) and north pole (right). Observation has been detected by analyzing data from NASA’s Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument called M3. M3, the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft, launched by ISRO in 2008 significantly equipped to the confirmation of the solid ice presence on the moon. Data and direct observations have shown that the most of the ice is concentrated at lunar craters (Temperature < -250 F) at southern pole while the northern pole’s ice is more widely distributed.

Currently, a team of scientist is learning more about this ice, possible interaction with lunar environment as a key mission for NASA and commercial partners to learn our closest neighbor, Moon.

 

If you want to see the full paper published, follow the link-  Water on the surface of the Moon as seen by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper: Distribution, abundance, and origins

News source: NASA

Organic Molecules found in interstellar space !

Since historic times, we have wondered where we came from and where life originated. As it became apparent that the Earth was just one planet orbiting the Sun, that the Sun was just one star among ∼1011 in our galaxy, and that the Galaxy itself was only one such object among ∼1011 similar systems populating the Universe out to a cosmic horizon, with perhaps countless more lying beyond, it became clear that life on other planets, near some other star, in some other galaxy was possible. The cosmological principle also makes this idea philosophically attractive. It would suggest that life is some general state of matter that prevails throughout the Universe. The probability of finding some form of life, however primitive, on other planets either within the Solar System or around nearby stars seems very high from this point of view. Nevertheless, we are unable to predict where life should exist, mainly because we do not yet understand the thermodynamics of living organisms and what different forms life may take.

As we know, things to be in equilibrium they should follow some permitted rules. Likewise, thermodynamics distinguishes between three types of systems. Isolated systems exchange neither energy nor matter with their surroundings. Closed systems exchange energy but not matter, and open systems exchange both matter and energy with the surroundings. Biological systems are always open, but in carrying out some of their functions, they may act as closed systems. Biological processes also exhibit a well-defined time dependence. Some physical processes could take place equally well whether time runs forward or backward. If we viewed a film of a clock’s pendulum, we would not be sure whether the film was running forward or back. Only if the film also showed the ratchet mechanism that advances the hands of the clock, would we be able to tell whether it was running in the right direction. The pendulum motion is reversible but the action of a ratchet is an irreversible process. Biological processes are invariably irreversible. In an irreversible process, entropy, a measure of disorder, always increases. If a cool interstellar grain absorbs visible starlight and re-emits the radiation thermally it does so by giving off a large number of low-energy photons.

The Universe is fundamentally biological. Even the Urey-Miller experiment that simulated the theorized early pre-life conditions on Earth, and produced amino acids, suggests this. The ammonia used was obtained by a process involving hydrogen of bio-origin, and the methane was also biological in origin. Non-biological catalysts would be poisoned almost instantaneously by sulfur gases under pre-life conditions. What this means is that most of the material in interstellar grains must be organic or life itself would have been impossible. The spectrum for all grains along the line of sight from the galactic center to the Earth is very much like that of dry bacteria. Either the grains are bacteria or are organic grains in proportions like bacteria (amino acids, nucleic acids, lipids and polysaccharides). Therefore, both theoretically and observationally, organic constituents fit the observations. Organic materials or bacteria would easily align in magnetic fields, and could produce superconducting surfaces that would generate filaments. Organic materials or bacteria could more easily produce the variety of objects in the Universe than inorganic or non-biological materials. As with so much of its constituents, the Universe itself is fundamentally biological. In fact, so much is this the case that life constitutes a physical law; it had to arise, it was an inevitable complexity of the real world is even more extraordinary with a hierarchy of living things.

 

Life result of the laws of physics as they exist. Moreover, the evidence indicates that the variety and permeates all of space, it is built into the very substance of the Universe, and has even brought about its own self-consciousness we humans. Yet, we have done little, in the scientific realm, to ask one ‘open’ question: Why? And the reason is that most scientists are afraid to admit that the Universe is purposeful and fundamentally biological. If electromagnetism did not exist then there would be no atoms, no chemistry, no life, and no heat and light from the Sun. If there were no strong force then nuclei would not have formed, and therefore, nothing would be. Likewise, if the weak force and gravity did not exist, then you would not be reading this, nor would any form of life be here

Yet, these four very different forces (and no others), each vital to all of the complex structures that make up the Universe, are so fine-tuned that they all combine to make a single super-force. Granted that we do not specifically know how to search for exotic forms of life, could we not find indications of extraterrestrial life in a form familiar on Earth? All terrestrial living matter contains organic molecules of some complexity proteins and nucleic acids, for example and we might expect to find either traces of such molecules or at least of their decay products. We know of two quite distinct locations in which complex molecules are found. There may be many more. First, observations of interstellar molecules by means of their microwave spectra have revealed the existence of such organic molecules as hydrogen cyanide, methyl alcohol, formaldehyde, and formic acid. Larger molecules, such as the sugar glycol-  aldehyde, CH2OHCHO, have also been found to be quite prevalent in interstellar space. Infrared observations similarly have shown the existence of the even larger, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules.

 

References:

[1] Choudhuri A. R, Astrophysics for Physicists, Cambridge University Press (2010)

[2] Gagnon, E. et al. Soft X-ray-driven femto-second molecular Dynamic.

 

Some Useful tips !

Personal Statement Guidelines

Personal statement is simply a collection of your strengths which try to show about your achievements and share your career aspirations. There is no hard and fast rule but principally, your personal statement should be a small and concise,your professionalism, and what you have to offer in terms of academic experience and ambition

 

Important questions that should be addressed in your personal statement:

What are your reasons for wanting to study PhD physics?
Why are you  interested in studying physics at ……….(name of university)  versus another university?
What are your long-term goals as a Physicist/Scientist?
What personal or academic characteristics are unique about you than others?
What are your personal interests?
What are your research experiences?

In the end, it needs to Include information about your college or University and the faculty writing your recommendations…

 

Follow the suggestions from the experts: words copied from https://www.theguardian.com

By all means mention what hooked you in the beginning, but do also mention what you are doing now to deepen your understanding,” says Anton Machacek, a physics teacher who graduated from Trinity College, Oxford.

He said “Popular science programmes rarely develop your thinking skills in the way universities will want. In this sense, I would say that the influence of Nina and her Nefarious Neurons on you as a toddler might count more in your favour than Prof Brian Cox at age 16.”

Think about which skills are relevant to your application: for example, computing experience will help you with a theoretical physics degree.

Machacek says it’s a shame that students often forget to talk about their A-level courses in their personal statements. “It’s no good saying ‘I’ve studied A-level physics’ – they already know that,” he says. “But you can say what skills you enjoyed developing and which areas excited you.”

 

Be specific. If The Big Bang Theory sparked your interest in physics, explain why. Schomerus, for instance, likes the episode where Sheldon takes a job as an unpaid waiter to try to discover how electrons move through graphene – it’s an area he’s done research in.

Make the statement truly personal,” he says, a point reiterated by Machacek, who is also a visiting research scientist at the Central Laser Facility in Rutherford.

“It is extremely important to be yourself,” he says. “If you are a quiet, modest type, and you force yourself to write an extrovert’s personal statement to make you seem bigger, very odd things can happen if you are interviewed.”

Most admissions tutors advise that content should always trump style or creativity, but stress that writing should be coherent because physicists must be able to communicate.

 

Extra-curricular activities can reflect passion – working at a science museum, being a member of a local astronomy society or having visited Cern, for example – but tutors realise that not everybody has these opportunities. Simply making the most of your school’s library is fine if it gives you a deeper appreciation of physics.

Some medications and its effect on Human Kidney (Renal System)

Several research findings reveals that some medications are harmful for Kidney function and responsible for Kidney stone formation.

 

“Medications that can damage the kidneys are known as “nephrotoxic medications.”

  • As we know whenever we go to the hospital having health issues, our treatment generally starts with antibiotic prescriptions. The problem arises when some of these antibiotics help to make crystals in renal system which don’t break down and blocks urinary track and hence urine flow.

 

  • Also, antibiotics constitutes some substances that can damage certain kidney cells when they try to filter them out. Some people also have allergic reactions to antibiotics that can affect their kidneys. All these things are more likely to happen if you take antibiotics for a long time or very high dose.

Vancomycin is an antibiotic used to treat severe  infections (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) but research found  it cause kidney  damage and acute interstitial nephritis, or swelling in the kidney.”

     “Aminoglycoside Antibiotics are known for causing kidney injury (nephrotoxicity), even at low doses. People with chronic kidney disease, dehydration, or those who have been taking these antibiotics for a long time are at particularly high risk. The most toxic aminoglycoside is neomycin. Although these medications are typically intravenous and used in hospitals, they are important to keep at the back of your mind”

 

  • Water pills are used to treat high blood pressure and some kinds of swelling. They help our body get rid of extra fluid. But they can sometimes dehydrate or lowers the water level of our body, which can be bad for our kidneys.

  • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)  like aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen  shouldn’t use them regularly for a long time or take high doses of them.

  • Some medications like omeprazole, Aciphex, Prilosec, Prevacid, Nexium are used to treat heartburn, ulcers, and acid reflux also called Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs).These drugs principally works by blocking the secretion of gastric acid. Although these powerful acid blockers were never designed for long-term use but unfortunately millions of peoples around the globe take these drugs indefinitely which potentially cause deadly consequences They lower the amount of acid in our stomach, but recent studies have shown that taking them for a long time can raise our chances of serious kidney problems and possibly lead to kidney failure. Researcher suggested that If you take a PPI regularly, ask your doctor about the possibility of switching to another drug which might  be far better for your health .Now, a new study from Stanford University shows these drugs double the risk of dying from a heart attack or stroke.

  • Some supplements like creatine and wormwood oil, may bad for our kidneys. It is recommended to tell your doctor about every supplement you take to make sure they’re helping or leading to damage of your body organ.